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Geography & History

This year we have introduced a new scheme of work that has been developed to ensure thatpupils will have full coverage of the National Curriculum in History and Geography. At the Willows, History and Geography are taught throughout KS2 and KS3 and follows a programme of study for each year very carefully and provides the right balance between using History and Geography as the main drivers but ensuring that creative and expressive arts gets a fair representation across the curriculum.

•       Each set of Learning Objectives links directly to the History or Geography knowledge, skills and understanding to ensure that pupils learning is progressive and continuous.

•      Each lesson has a suggested ‘wow’ or hook and its own suggested reflection. By using these we will get a more complete level of challenge for the pupils.

•      You will also note that every opportunity has been taken to help pupils apply their English and maths skills where it is possible to do so.

•      Where possible and appropriate, visits are made to further support the learning taking place in school. Educational visits are made to historical places, museums, recycling plants, contrasting localities and many more places. We also feel it is important that the pupils at The Willows School take part in local studies within the area of Thurcroft and wider areas of Rotherham and Sheffield. As part of our whole school curriculum we also hold Curriculum weeks which are often linked with Religious Education, History and Geography topics

  • Every attempt has been made to bring History and Geography to life by taking starting points from the pupil’s context. In this way it is hoped that History and Geography will be viewed as exciting and interesting on a two year rolling programme of study.
  • During the year there will be also be whole school topic days to ensure full coverage of the curriculum that meets the needs of pupils.

National Curriculum Requirements of Geography for KS2 pupils

Pupils will develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. They will explore, experience and understand basic subject-specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography and begin to use geographical skills, including first-hand observation, to enhance their locational awareness.

Pupils will be taught to:

Location knowledge

•      name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans

•      name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the UK and its surrounding seas

Place knowledge

•      understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country

Human and physical geography

•      identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the UK and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles

•      use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to:

•      key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather

•      key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop

Geographical skills and fieldwork

•      use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the UK and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage

•      use simple compass directions and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map

•      use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key

•      use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.  

 

National Curriculum Requirements of History for Key Stage 2 pupils

Pupils will develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They will experience and use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.

Pupils will be taught about:

•      changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life

•      events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.

•      the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods.

•      significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

 

National Curriculum Requirements of Geography for Key Stage 3 pupils

Pupils will extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the UK and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They will develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge.

Pupils should be taught to:

Location knowledge

•      locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities

•      name and locate counties and cities of the UK, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features, and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time

•      identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Place knowledge

•      understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the UK, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America

Human and physical geography

describe and understand key aspects of:

•      physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle

•      human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links

Geographical skills and fieldwork

•      use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

•      use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key to build their knowledge of the UK and the wider world

•      use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

 

National Curriculum Requirements of History for Key Stage 3 pupils

Pupils will continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Pupils will be taught about:

  • changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age
  • the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain
  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots
  • the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

 

Scheme of work Year 3 & 4

Enquiry questions

AUTUMN 1

 

YEAR A

Why can’t a meerkat live in the North Pole?

 

AUTUMN 2

 

Where do the leaves go to in winter?

 

 

 

 SPRING 1

 

Why is the XBox

more fun than

Grandma and

Grandad’s old toys?

SPRING 2

 

Would Michael Jackson have won Britain’s Got Talent?

 

SUMMER 1 

 

Where do and might the wheels on the bus go?

 

 

 

SUMMER 2 

 

Stone Age to 1066

Who first lived in Britain?

YEAR B

 Why can’t my Nemo live in the North Sea?

 

Where do daisies go in winter?

What has changed since your grandparents were young?

Who was famous when your mum and dad were little?

Where could the school mini bus take us?

Ancient Civilizations

•      Ancient Greece

Has Greece always been in the news?

             

Year A - academic year 2016-17             Year B - academic year 2017-18

 

Scheme of work Year 5 & 6

Enquiry questions

Autumn 1

 

Year A What would Dora the Explorer/ Ben Ten find exciting about Thurcroft?

 

 

Autumn 2

 

Year A What were the people who lived here like a 100 years ago?

 

 

 

Spring 1

 

Year A How have Rosa Parks and Nelson Mandela helped to make the world a better place?

Spring 2

 

Year A Where would you prefer to live: England or Africa?

 

 

 

 

Summer 1

 

Year A Why do we love to be beside the seaside?

 

 

 

 

Summer 2

 

Year A The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

 

Year B What would Dora the Explorer/ Ben Ten find exciting about Rotherham? 

Year B What was it like when the Queen came to the throne in 1953?

Year B Why were Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong brave people?

Year BWhere would you prefer to live: England or India?

Year B Why do people live at the seaside?

Year BAncient Egypt

 

Year A – academic year 2016-17                  B – academic year 2017-18

 

Scheme of work Year 7 & 8

Enquiry questions

Teachers to decide on when to teach Year 7 & 8 units in any order depending on the interests and needs of pupils. Please see termly class curriculum overview for when units taught.

Y7

Autumn 1

Why do so many people choose to go to the Mediterranean for their holidays?

Autumn 2

Gunpowder, treason and plot

Why should gunpowder, treason and plot never be forgotten?

Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots

Were the Anglo-Saxons really smashing?

Geography

 

What makes the Earth angry?

Geography

Why is the River Don so important to Sheffield?

History

How can we re-discover the wonder of Ancient Egypt?

Y8

Autumn 1

Geography

Why has Greece always been in the news?

Autumn 2 Gunpowder, treason and plot + Charles 1 execution

Why should gunpowder, treason and plot never be forgotten?

Geography

 

Why is London such a cool place to live?

History

 

Who first lived in Britain?

 

History

The Viking and Anglo-Saxon

Who were the early law makers?

Geography 

 

Where would you choose to build a city?

 

Scheme of work Year 9

Enquiry questions

Teachers to decide on when to teach Year 9 units in any order depending on the interests and needs of pupils. Please see termly class curriculum overview for when units taught.

Stone Age to 1066

 

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain

 

 

Why were the Romans so powerful and what did we learn from them?

A Study of an aspect or theme in British history, beyond 1066

 

 

 

Why were the Norman castles certainly not bouncy?

Significant Themes in British history (Preferably from a Local interest point of view)

 

World War 2 – Battle of Britain

How did the Battle of Britain change World War 2? 

Geography skills to be taught where possible in all units

Human & Physical

use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world

use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Rainforests of the Amazon

Brazil – physical features

 

Why should the rainforests be important to us all?

Brazil –human Geography trade and growing economy

- Fair Trade

Why is Brazil in the news again?

UK and wider world (+ Compass Points)

 

I’m a Year 9 pupil, can you get me out of here?

Mrs. Perry

Humanities (History & Geography) Coordinator

September 2016